Author Topic: Nigerians to start paying £3, 000 to enter the UK from November  (Read 710 times)

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Offline mfoniso

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According to a report by UK Daily Mail, visitors from 'high risk' countries in Africa and Asia will have to put up a £3,000 cash bond to enter Britain.

The money will be kept by the Government if visitors do not return home by the time their visas expire.

A pilot scheme, introduced by Home Secretary Theresa May, will target hundreds of people coming to Britain on six-month visit visas from India, Pakistan, Nigeria, Ghana, Sri Lanka and Bangladesh.

The countries have been picked for their high number of visa applications and what the Government sees as relatively high levels of immigration abuse and fraud, reports the Sunday Times.

The bonds, to be introduced from November, will only apply to non-EU migrants, otherwise they would fall foul of European rights to free movement.

'This is the next step in making sure our immigration system is more selective, bringing down net migration from the hundreds of thousands to the tens of thousands while still welcoming the brightest and the best to Britain,' Mrs May told the Sunday Times.

'In the long run we’re interested in a system of bonds that deters overstaying and recovers costs if a foreign national has used our public services.'

A second scheme will cover countries such as Kenya, the newspaper reports, which are considered to be lower-risk because immigration officials have fewer doubts about migrants' plans to return home.

About 2.2million people are granted visas to enter Britain every year. Last year 296,000 people from India were granted six-month visas, as were 101,000 from Nigeria, 53,000 from Pakistan and 14,000 apiece from Bangladesh and Sri Lanka.

The Home Secretary plans to reduce annual net migration to under 100,000 by 2015.
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Offline Sub5

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Re: UK High Commissioner Explains The £3,000 Visa Bonds
« Reply #1 on: June 26, 2013, 12:18:18 PM »
THE British High Commissioner to Nigeria, Dr Andrew Pocock, has cleared the air on the controversial £3,000 visa bonds for Nigerian visa applicants to the United Kingdom (UK).

Pocock, who met with the Nigeria’s Foreign Minister, Olugbenga Ashiru, on Tuesday, said the visa bond projects was not what was reported in most of the Nigerian media.

He added that the British government “has announced that it intends to undertake a very small scale trial of the use of financial bonds, as a way of tackling abuse in the immigration system – which occurs when some people overstay their visa terms.”

He said “the details of a pilot scheme are still being worked out,” adding that no final decision had been made.

According to Pocock, “if the pilot scheme were to go ahead in Nigeria, it would affect only a very small number of the highest risk visitors.

“The vast majority would not be required to pay a bond. Those paying bonds would receive the bond back if they abided by the terms of their visa.”

He maintained that the travel between two countries was a key part of strong cultural and business relationship, noting that “financial bonds would be focused on only a tiny minority of potential abusers. It would not be a £3,000 visa charge as some media reporting has alleged.”

The commissioner added that with over 180,000 Nigerians applying to visit the UK each year, about 70 per cent or around 125,000 of the figure were successful.

He assured that “as soon as more details of the policy is decided, we will inform the Nigerian government and public fully and officially, in the spirit of our long standing friendship.”

Offline debby

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Re: Nigerians to start paying £3, 000 to enter the UK from November
« Reply #2 on: July 30, 2013, 12:30:12 PM »
It's has been finally agreed upon. From November 2013, Nigeria will be among the six listed Commonwealth 'high risk' countries whose citizens will be required to pay £3,000 tourists visa bond before they are allowed into the UK. The remaining five are: India, Kenya, Sri Lanka, Pakistan and Bangladesh.

But here's what the UK government are saying to pacify citizens of these countries who are outraged by this new policy. They say it's not all visitors that will be required to pay the bond, just people they consider 'highest risk'; that is people who will collect visa and refuse to leave Britain or overstay their visa terms. Those paying bonds will receive the bond back, if they abided by the terms of their visa.

According to the UK Financial Times report last Friday, the UK Home Office say there's no going back as the scheme is their most effective way of tackling abuse in their immigration system. Nigeria and the other five countries account for more than five hundred thousand visa applications in 2012.

If tuooo say naija had good Educational system and other things that is drawing people to the Uk, Who for even go there????

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